Questions and Answers:

We respect and want to help you by answering some of your most frequently asked questions.

Other information

What is R-value?


Insulation is identified and labeled by its R-value. “R” stands for resistance to heat flow; therefore, the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power.

How can I tell the R-value of my current insulation?


Different insulation products have different R-values so be sure to read the packaging carefully.  Additionally, the R-Value of your insulation can decrease over time as the product ages or settles.
To determine the R-Value of your current insulation, please contact us at (845) 534-4656.

 

What areas of my home should be insulated?


Insulation is not just for attics and outside walls. Insulation should also be installed in other areas of your home such as ceilings with unheated spaces, basement walls, floors above vented crawl spaces, cathedral ceilings, floors over unheated garages or porches, knee walls, in between interior walls (especially bathrooms), and ceilings or floors for extra sound control.

I’m on a budget. Will insulating certain areas of home result in larger energy savings?


Yes and no.  While insulating certain areas will provide you with long term energy savings, in order to fully realize the energy savings, one should properly insulate their entire home.

 

What is R-value?


Insulation is identified and labeled by its R-value. “R” stands for resistance to heat flow; therefore, the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power.

How can I tell the R-value of my current insulation?


Different insulation products have different R-values so be sure to read the packaging carefully.  Additionally, the R-Value of your insulation can decrease over time as the product ages or settles.
To determine the R-Value of your current insulation, please contact us at (845) 345-8167.

 

How much insulation do I need to install?


Different areas of the country have different recommended R-values for insulation based on your geographic location and its corresponding climate.  Subsequently, colder northern climates will have higher required R-Values than warmer tropical locales.
The amount of insulation needed is dependent on your home’s climate and the type of insulation being used.  Consult a professional insulation contractor to determine the necessary R-Values needed for your location.

 

What is retrofit insulation?


Retrofit insulation is simply an industry term for the upgrade of an existing home’s insulation.

 

During a retrofit, do you need to remove my existing walls and/or floors?


No. During a retrofit, we start by removing small sections of siding, where we will drill small holes into the wall sheeting of your home. From there, we insert a small hose into the drilled holes that reaches to the top and bottom of the wall cavity, resulting in a dense, tight, well insulated cavity with no air infiltration.
Once filled, we re-install the siding. No unsightly plugs.

 

Where can I find information on other Energy Saving opportunities?


A good source for energy saving tips is the Federal ENERGY STAR program website from the US Government, www.energystar.gov.

 

Do I need to remove existing insulation that is already in place?


Not necessarily. Adding additional insulation can have a cumulative impact on the overall R-value.  A professional insulation contractor will be able to determine if the existing insulation can provide any cumulative effect.

 

Are certain insulation types more eco-friendly?


Yes.  Certain insulation types are more eco-friendly than others.  For example, the Nu-Wool Cellulose insulation we use at New York State Foam & Energy is made from 100% recycled paper.

 

Can Ice Dams and/or the formation of icicles be caused from insulation or lack thereof?


Yes. Warm air inside your home can leak into the attic, warming the underside of your roof, causing snow and ice to melt and then refreeze as it runs off your roof.
This is what will then form Icicles and Ice Dams. Though poor insulation may be the root cause of the icicles, ventilation can also play a part.

Just like you wouldn’t leave your coat unzipped on a blustery, cold day, you also need to ensure that there aren’t any gaps in a home’s insulation. Gaps can create pathways for conditioned (heated or cooled) air to leak out and unconditioned air to leak in, sacrificing the homeowner’s comfort. However, many common insulating products are difficult to install without gaps, especially in irregularly sized spaces. You can identify some of these gaps by conducting an energy audit.

 

What is the difference between Open-Cell and Closed-Cell foam and in what instances should I consider them?


There are two verisions of this foam.  One is Open-Cell and the other Closed-Cell foams.  Their differences are in cost, application methods, and performance. Basically, for a area that needs to support a load, open cell is appropriate.  Closed cell is rigid and strong, but also heavy.  Although open cell is an less expensive alturnative, is doesn’t have the density needed for some of the higher performing return numbers explained in our Tripolymer Spray Foam Insulation page.  Please contact us if you have any additional questions.

BASEMENTS


New York State Foam & Energy has been a leader in our market place when it comes to basement solutions. With over 23 years of experience we KNOW basements!

Did you know one of the leading causes of cold floors is attributed to under insulated rim joists?
Do you have cold or drafty floors?
Does your basement have an odor?
Do you have damp walls?
Water pooling on the slab?
Has your current waterproofing system ever let you down?
Are you considering finishing your basement?
Are there any cracks forming on your foundation walls?

If the answer is Yes to any of the above questions you should consider calling us today!